• +30 26410 74108-9
  • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • 08:00 - 15:00

Courses

Browse our courses by semester

1st - Semester

1.10C - General Chemistry

1.10C - General Chemistry

General Chemistry

Code: 1.10C

Semester: 1 / Year: 1 (Mantatory)

Teachers: Ladavos Athanasios

Course Web Page

Lectures hours (per week): 3

laboratory hours (per week): 2

Subject

Living in a world of Chemistry. Introduction (atomic theory, periodic table). Nuclear reactions-nuclear energy, Chemical bonds. Liquids and solutions, Chemical equilibrium - ionic equilibria in aqueous solutions (acids and bases, hydrolysis, buffer solutions, precipitation, titration). Oxidation-reduction reactions, galvanic cells. Chemical thermodynamics. Chemical kinetics. Introduction to Organic Chemistry. Basic Laboratory techniques. Solutions preparation. Mixture’s components separation. Qualitative Analysis. Quantitative Analysis. Titration. pH estimation. Solution’s conductivity estimation.

Educational Aims

The scope of this course is the teaching of main chemical principles and laws. Moreover this course introduces the student to the most recent information on subjects as energy, new advances in materials and environmental issues. Students will understand the scientific bases for making the important personal choices demanded for the use of chemicals and chemical products and how chemistry research and development will affect the quality of human life.

Bythe end of this course every student is expected to have obtained i) main chemical principles within the framework of real-world applications ii)identification of chemical bond type iii)physicochemical properties and applications of main inorganic and organic compounds iv)chemical equilibrium, chemical equilibrium of weak acid and bases, v)importance of buffer solutions, vi)neutralization and hydrolysis vii)concentration estimation viii)pH estimation of various solutions and mixtures ix)redox reactions and applications.

Furthermorestudentswill obtain the necessary knowledgethatwill helpthemto understand the content of next courses as  “Food Chemistry and Technology”, “Food Safety” and “Organic Chemistry”.

By the end of this course every student will be familiar with the use of reagents, solvents andbasic laboratory techniques such as: solution preparation, mixture’s components separation, qualitative analysis, quantitative analysis, titration and applications, pH measurement, solution’s conductivity measurement.

Student Evaluation

  1. Written examination after the end of the semester. The mark constitutes the 75% of the final grade (G75%). Minimum passing grade:  5.
  2. Reports following completion of each laboratory experiment. The mean mark constitutes the other 25% of the final grade (G25%). Minimum passing grade:  5.

The final grade for the course is calculated by the final grade in the Lab (25%) and the grade of the final written examination (75%). The student must have secured a minimum grade of 5 in both Lab and the final written examination.

Bibliography

  1. General Chemistry, Ebbing-Gammon, translation in Greek by Ν.Κlouras,  Travlos Publishing

  2. General and Inorganic Chemistry, in  Greek, M.Lalia-Kantouri, S.Papastefanou, ΖΗΤΗPublishing, Thes/niki

  3. WorldofChemistry, 2nd Edition, Joesten and Wood, Saunders College Publishing

  4. Notes for Laboratory of General Chemistry , A.Ladavos, in Greek

1.2C - Introduction to Information Systems
1.7C - English for Specific Academic Purposes I
1.8C - Mathematics for Business and Finance
1.9C - Agricultural Economics

2nd - Semester

2.2C - Introduction to Management

2.2C - Introduction to Management

Introduction to Management

Code: 2.2C

Semester: 2 / Year: 1 (Mantatory)

Teachers: Bouranta Athanasia

Course Web Page

Lectures hours (per week): 3

laboratory hours (per week):

Subject

This module provides a framework for understanding the four critical management functions involved in planning, organizing, controlling and leading. These functions are considered fundamental in accomplishing organizational goals. The course also aims to help students acquire basic skills and abilities for effective time management, risk management, crisis management and change management. Case studies and discussion of related articles are utilized for deeper understanding of the discussed areas.

Educational Aims

This course is designed to develop student awareness of organizations and the variety of skills useful in managerial roles, foster a spirit of critical inquiry and stimulate student pursuit of personal development and lifelong learning. At the end of this course, students will:

  • Become familiar with the historical development of management theory
  • Understand the four functions of the managerial process
  • Define goals and plans, applying the appropriate management techniques and taking environmental uncertainty into consideration
  • Indentify how organizational structure and coordination across departments can be used to achieve strategic goals
  • Learn about control process and leadership styles
  • Plan and exercise conscious control over the amount of time spent on specific managerial activities
  • Acquire skills and techniques required to deal with serious situations (crises) before, during, and after they have occurred.
  • Demonstrate an ability to use appropriate techniques in order to facilitate the initiation of organizational changes.

Student Evaluation

Student assessment is mainly based on the written examination at the end of the semester, which includes questions that evaluate both the acquired knowledge by students and their ability to utilize them critically.

However, students can gain extra points by working on an assignment given to them during the term. This is not compulsory but can significantly contribute to the final record. Grades are based 20% on assignment and 80% on final exams.

Bibliography

  1. Χυτήρης, Λ. (2013), Μάνατζμεντ Αρχές Διοίκησης Επιχειρήσεων, Εκδόσεις Φαίδιμος (in Greek).
  2. Κέφης, Β. (2005), Ολοκληρωμένο Μάνατζμεντ, Εκδόσεις Κριτική ΑΕ (in Greek).
  3. Μπουραντάς, Δ. (2002), Μάνατζμεντ, Εκδόσεις Μπένου (in Greek).
  4. Τζωρτζάκης, Κ. και Τζωρτζάκη, Α.Μ. (2014), Οργάνωση & Διοίκηση - Το Μάνατζμεντ της Νέας Εποχής, Εκδόσεις Rossili (in Greek).
  5. Θεοχαράκης, Β., Μυλωνόπουλος, Ν. και Tσούκας Χ.Κ. (2008), Σύγχρονες τάσεις στο Μάνατζμεντ, Εκδόσεις Καστανιώτη (in Greek).
  6. Griffin, W.R. (2012), Management, Cengage Learning.
  7. Daft, R. (2006), The new era of Management, Thomson South-Western.
  8. Goodman, S., Pamela, L., Patricia, F. (2006), Management: Challenges for Tomorrow's Leaders, Cengage Learning.
  9. Robbins Stephen P. (2009), Management5, Frenchs Forest, N.S.W. : Pearson Education.
  10. Μπρίνια Β. (2006), “Γενική και ειδική διδακτική οικονομικών επιστημών (ΑΕΙ και ΤΕΙ). Ψυχοπαιδαγωγική”, Εκδόσεις Σταμούλη (in Greek).
2.3C - Environmental Management
2.6C - Plant Morphology and Physiology
2.7C - English for Specific Academic Purposes II
2.8C - Chemistry & Food Technology

3rd - Semester

3.10C - General Financial Accounting

3.10C - General Financial Accounting

General Financial Accounting

Code: 3.10C

Semester: 3 / Year: 2 (Mantatory)

Teachers: Ragazou Konstantina

Course Web Page: https://eclass.upatras.gr/courses/DEAPT264/

Lectures hours (per week): 3

laboratory hours (per week): 2

Bibliography

  1. Γενική Χρηματοοικονομική Λογιστική (τόμος Α΄), Β. Φίλιος, 1η έκδοση / 2013, Εκδόσεις  ΣΥΓΧΡΟΝΗ ΕΚΔΟΤΙΚΗ ΕΠΕ.
  2. Γενική Χρηματοοικονομική Λογιστική, Δ. Γκίνογλου, Π. Ταχυνάκης, Σ. Μωυσή, 1η έκδοση / 2005, Εκδόσεις ROSILI ΕΜΠΟΡΙΚΗ - ΕΚΔΟΤΙΚΗ Μ. ΕΠΕ
3.11C - Operational Research
3.1C - Statistics I
3.7C - Food Safety
3.8C - Modern Trends in Plant Production

4th - Semester

4.10C - Foundations of Agricultural and Food Marketing

4.10C - Foundations of Agricultural and Food Marketing

Foundations of Agricultural and Food Marketing

Code: 4.10C

Semester: 4 / Year: 2 (Mantatory)

Teachers: Theodoridis Prokopios

Course Web Page

Lectures hours (per week): 3

laboratory hours (per week):

Subject

This specific course provides the students an introduction to the utilization and application of the marketing concept on an entrepreneurial level. The lectures have been structured in a way that makes the students familiar with the fundamental marketing concepts and tools such as: marketing management, marketing strategy, market segmentation, pricing, promotion, sales, product life cycle, consumer behaviour, market & marketing research and marketing plan. The marketing elements examined at this course are synthesized and implemented in the context of a broader marketing programming. One of the most important goals of this lecture is, understanding the crucial role that marketing plays in the prosperity and growth of a company. It will also be given emphasis on the practical application of marketing, by creatively combining theory and practice.

The course is organized around topics such as:

  • Concept and philosophy of Marketing (Definitions, Concepts and Marketing orientation)
  • The Marketing Environment - The external environment (political, social, economic, technological, legal, cultural), Competition
  • Consumer Behaviour
  • Market and marketing research
  • Market segmentation-targeting-positioning - Segmentation criteria, positioning choice
  • Marketing mix
  • Product
  • Distribution
  • Promotion
  • Price

Educational Aims

Upon successful completion of this module the learner will be able to:

  • Understand the particularities of marketing management.
  • Identify markets and customers, both existing and potential ones.
  • Use the tools of the marketing mix in a meaningful way, aiming to offer superior value to customers.
  • Recognize the importance of customer loyalty and know the different ways of meeting the customers’ needs.

Student Evaluation

The methods of teaching this course are lecture, group discussion and case studies.  Lectures will be based on text materials, outside readings and practical experience on the part of the instructor. 

It is based on the marks achieved in the written exams taken at the end of the term. However students can gain extra points by working on assignments given to them during semester. This is not compulsory, but can significantly contribute to the finally achieved degree.

Bibliography

  1. Κωνσταντίνος Τζωρτζάκης, Alan Charlesworth (2020), ΜΑΡΚΕΤΙΝΓΚ - Περιλαμβάνει και Digital Μάρκετινγκ, ROSILI ΕΜΠΟΡΙΚΗ - ΕΚΔΟΤΙΚΗ Μ.ΕΠΕ
  2. Πανηγυράκης Γ. (2003), Στρατηγική Διοίκηση Επώνυμου Προϊόντος, Σταμούλης, (in Greek).
  3. Perreault W., (2011), Marketing: Μια Στρατηγική Προσέγγιση, Broken Hill Publishers LTD, (in Greek)
  4. Pride, W., & Odies, C. F. (2014), Foundations of marketing. Cengage Learning.
4.11C - Cost Accounting and Price Analysis
4.12C - Geography of Production and Labour
4.1C - Management Information Systems
4.3C - Statistics II

5th - Semester

5.5C - Consumer Behaviour

5.5C - Consumer Behaviour

Consumer Behaviour

Code: 5.5C

Semester: 5 / Year: 3 (Mantatory)

Teachers: Theodoridis Prokopios

Course Web Page

Lectures hours (per week): 3

laboratory hours (per week):

Subject

Consumer Behavior is a course concerning the processes involved when people acquire, use, and dispose of goods, services, ideas and activities.  This course examines the marketing implications of the psychological, sociocultural and decision-making factors that impact consumer behavior. Successful marketing requires identifying  and serving the needs and wants of customers.  For firms marketing to end-users, a clear understanding of consumer behavior is essential.  This course introduces concepts and theories that can help marketing managers better understand their customers and develop appropriate strategies for serving their needs.

Content:

  • IntroductiontoConsumerBehaviour
  • Modelsofconsumerbehavior
  • Involvement
  • Consumers’ Perceptions
  • Social Groups – Culture and subcultures – The role of family
  • Demographics and psychographics
  • Diffusion of Innovation
  • Situational  effects
  • Attitudes
  • Organizational buying behavior

Educational Aims

Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to: 

  • To understand the major individual psychological influences on consumer behavior.
  • To learn the steps and concepts related to the consumer decision-making process.
  • To learn how various individuals, groups, and environmental factors influence consumer behavior.
  • To understand the role of cultural influences on consumer behavior.
  • To apply consumer behavior concepts and theory to marketing management situations. 

Student Evaluation

It is based on the marks achieved in the written exams taken at the end of the term. However students can gain extra points by working on assignments given to them during semester. This is not compulsory, but can significantly contribute to the finally achieved degree.

Bibliography

  • Μπάλτας Γεώργιος και Παπασταθοπούλου Πολίνα, (2013), Συμπεριφορά Καταναλωτή, Εκδόσεις Rosili, Αθήνα, (in Greek).  
  • Αυλωνίτης Γεώργιος, Δημητριάδης Σέργιος, Ήντουνας Κωνσταντίνος, (2014), Στρατηγικό Βιομηχανικό (Β2Β) Μάρκετινγκ, Εκδόσεις Rosili, Αθήνα, (in Greek).
  • Πανηγυράκης Γεώργιος (2003), Στρατηγική Διοίκηση Επωνύμου Προϊόντος, Εκδόσεις Σταμούλη, Αθήνα, (in Greek).
  • Σιώμκος Γεώργιος, (2002),Συμπεριφορά Καταναλωτή και Στρατηγική Μάρκετινγκ, Εκδόσεις Σταμούλη, Αθήνα, (in Greek).
  • Martin Evans, Gordon Foxall and Ahmad Jamal, (2009), Consumer Behaviour, John Wiley and Sons Ltd.
  • Michael R. Solomon, Gary J. Bamossy and  Soren Askegaard, (2007), Consumer Behaviour, Pearson Education Limited.
5.6C - Financial Management
5.7C - Microeconomics
5.8C - Balance Sheet Analysis and Evaluation

5th Semester - Optional Courses

5.9S - Fertilisers

5.9S - Fertilisers

Fertilisers

Code: 5.9S

Semester: 5 / Year: 3 (Optional)

Teachers: Triantafilidis Vasilios

Course Web Page: http://plantlab.deapt.upatras.gr/en/

Lectures hours (per week): 3

laboratory hours (per week):

Subject

The course syllabus is:

  • The processes of uptake, transport and metabolism of nutrients
  • Soil analysis, leaf analysis and macroscopic examination of the symptoms as means of diagnosing nutrient deficiency or excess. Knowledge of the above can increase fertilizer efficiency, crop yields, improve the quality of agricultural products by reducing the risks of soil and water pollution of the agro-system

The subject of Plant Nutrition concerns the whole plant production. The knowledge of the plant nutrition needs, the fertilizer application principles, the fertilization season, the transfer of the fertilizers to the soil, the loss of the fertilizer, the methods and the doses of the nutrients lead to good plant nutrition practices, producing quality agricultural products

Educational Aims

The course provides basic knowledge on nutrition and fertilization of cultivated crops as well as the processes of intake, transport and metabolization of nutrients in plants.

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Gather knowledge that involves a critical understanding of theories and principles such as nutrition, nutrient intake and metabolism processes in plants, nutrient deficiencies, impact on the quality of agricultural products and the environment.
  • Gather knowledge and enrich them by using advanced science textbooks, including perspectives emerging from modern advances at the cutting edge of the cognitive subject of plant nutrition.
  • Collect and interpret data, within the cognitive field of Plant Nutrition and formulate judgement on relevant social, scientific or ethical issues relating to agricultural production.
  • Developed knowledge-based skills to continue further studying with a high degree of autonomy.
  • Assess the basic Plant Nutrition needs and apply good agricultural practices in the context of sustainable agricultural production.
  • Communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions to both qualified and non-specialized audiences and to work with fellow students to present a plan for proper plant nutrition of one or more crops.

Student Evaluation

Student’s evaluation is mainly based on the final written exams performance given at the end of the semester (70%). The final exams contain Short Response Questions or Multiple-Choice questions. Solving problems related to plant nutrition and fertilizers. Comparative evaluation of the theory.

Presentation of teamwork (30%). Delivering written works and public -presentation by Working Groups.

Bibliography

  1. Ιωάννης Θέριος (1996), Ανόργανη θρέψη και λιπάσματα. Εκδόσεις: ΓΑΡΤΑΓΑΝΗΣ ΑΓΙΣ-ΣΑΒΒΑΣ, ISBN: 960-88706-2-3, (in Greek). Κωδικός Βιβλίου στον Εύδοξο: 3558
  2. Στυλιανίδης Δ.Κ., Σιμώνης Ασ. Δ., Συργιαννίδης Γ. Δ., (2002), Θρέψη, λίπανση φυλλοβόλων οπωροφόρων δέντρων. Εκδόσεις: ΣΤΑΜΟΥΛΗ Α.Ε., ISBN: 978-960-351-377-6 (in Greek). Κωδικός Βιβλίου στον Εύδοξο: 22850
5.10S - Quality Management Systems
5.11S - Agricultural Process Enterprises Management
5.12S - Biological Agriculture and Stock Farming

6th - Semester

6.1C - Organizational Behavior

6.1C - Organizational Behavior

Organizational Behavior

Code: 6.1C

Semester: 6 / Year: 3 (Mantatory)

Teachers: Bouranta Athanasia

Course Web Page

Lectures hours (per week): 3

laboratory hours (per week):

Subject

Organizational Behaviour (OB) is an applied behavioural science that draws concepts from various social sciences, including psychology, sociology, anthropology and political science.

This course covers a wide breadth of theories and applications dealing with human attitudes, behaviour and organizational effectiveness.

Initially, topics of the course include perception and personality, motivation, leadership, teamwork, communication, conflict management and organizational culture.

Educational Aims

The goal of this course is to help you develop a conceptual understanding of OB theories and provide students with skills to put those ideas and theories into practice. Key techniques and processes designed to improve organizational efficiency and effectiveness are fully examined from the perspective of management, workers, and society. The goal of this course is to help students understand OB theories and empower them to put them into practice.

At the end of this course, students are expected to:

  • Become familiar with OB theories and concepts for facing managerial problems
  • Understand individual and group behaviour in organization
  • Learn motivation theories and use them to motivate employees at work
  • Acquire critical leadership skills
  • Demonstrate an ability to be a team player
  • Communicate effectively and use communication to persuade and influence employees
  • Identify the causes of organizational conflict and learn how to manage them
  • Deal with workplace stress.

Student Evaluation

Student assessment is mainly based on the written examination at the end of the semester, which includes questions that evaluate both the acquired knowledge by students and their ability to utilize them critically.

However, students can gain extra points by working on an assignment given to them during the term. This is not compulsory but can significantly contribute to the final record. Grades are based 20% on assignment and 80% on final exams.

Bibliography

  1. Χυτήρης, Λ. (2013), Οργανωσιακή Συπεριφορά, Εκδόσεις Φαίδιμος (in Greek).
  2. Βακόλα, Μ. και Νικολάου, Ι. (2012), Οργανωσιακή Ψυχολογία & Συμπεριφορά, Εκδόσεις Rosili (in Greek).
  3. Ζαβλανός, Μ. (2002), Οργανωτική Συμπεριφορά, Εκδόσεις Σταμούλη (in Greek).
  4. Robbins, S. και Judge, T. (2011), Οργανωσιακή Συμπεριφορά, Εκδόσεις Κριτική (in Greek).
  5. Kreitner, R. and Kinicki, A. (2012), Organizational Behavior, Boston: McGraw-Hill.        
  6. Colquitt, J., LePine, J. and Wesson, M. (2010), Organizational Behaviour. Improving Performance and Commitment in the Workplace, NY: McGraw-Hill Irwin.      
  7. Brooks, I. (2009), Organisational Behaviour: Individuals, Groups, and Organisations, Harlow: FT Prentice Hall.   
  8. Buchanan, D, and Huczynski, A. (2010), Organisational Behaviour. Harlow: FT Prentice Hall.
  9. George, J. and Jones, G. (2007), Understanding and Managing Organizational Behavior, Harlow: FTPrentice Hall.

Συναφή επιστημονικά περιοδικά:

  • Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes
  • Journal of Organizational Behavior
  • Research in Organizational Behavior
  • Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology
  • European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology
6.2C - Marketing Strategy
6.5C - Agricultural Accounting-Estimation
6.8C - Food Safety Management System

6th Semester - Optional Courses

6.7S - Special Issues of Financial Management

6.7S - Special Issues of Financial Management

Special Issues of Financial Management

Code: 6.7S

Semester: 6 / Year: 3 (Optional)

Teachers: Pendaraki Konstantina

Course Web Page: https://eclass.upatras.gr/courses/DEAPT196/

Lectures hours (per week): 3

laboratory hours (per week):

Subject

  • Concept and purpose of Financial Management
  • Investments
  • Risk and return
  • Portfolio Theory
  • The Markowitz model
  • Efficient portfolios
  • Optimal Portfolio
  • Single index model
  • Capital market theory
  • The Capital Asset Pricing Model
  • Portfolio performance measures and risk adjusted measures
  • Diversified portfolios
  • Mutual Funds and their Operating Framework
  • Evaluation of fund managers
  • Performance persistence of mutual funds

Educational Aims

The objective of the course is to deepen on financial issues through the development of case studies on specific areas. Specifically, the main objective of the course is the documentation of the methodological framework of portfolio theory, the evaluation of the performance and risk of mutual funds, the evaluation of effective portfolios, the knowledge of the appropriate techniques for dealing with real financial management problems.

The theory of the course is taking place in the classroom, while the knowledge of using large amount of data and the necessary scientific tools for management, evaluation and assessment portfolios with/without using software is taught in the computer lab.

At the end of this course the students shouldbe able to:

  • Investigate in a systematic way the volume of information provided by the Internet and make use of the opportunities it offers for a better understanding of the theoretical and empirical framework of financial management,
  • Process appropriate financial databases,
  • Select and evaluate efficient portfolios,
  • Comment and discuss for the difficulty of modern portfolio theory,
  • Evaluate the performance and risk of funds,
  • Evaluate the performance of fund managers,
  • Evaluate the performance persistence of mutual funds, etc. 

Student Evaluation

Presentation of case studies and oral examination.

Bibliography

  1. K. Πενταράκη και Κ. Ζοπουνίδης, «Αξιολόγηση και Διαχείριση Αμοιβαίων Κεφαλαίων: Θεωρητική και Εμπειρική Προσέγγιση», Εκδόσεις Κλειδάριθμος, Αθήνα, 2003, (in Greek).
  2. Ι. Αποστολόπουλος, «Ειδικά θέματα χρηματοδοτικής διοικήσεως»,  Σταμούλη Α.Ε., Αθήνα, 2012 (in Greek).
  3. Ψαρράς, Ι., Ζοπουνίδης, Κ., Ξυδώνας, Π., «Σύγχρονη θεωρία χαρτοφυλακίου» 1η έκδ. - Αθήνα: Κλειδάριθμος, 2010, ISBN 978-960-461-349-6 (in Greek).
  4. Elton, E. J., Gruber, M. J., Brown, S.J., and Goetzmann, W.N., «Modern Portfolio Theory and Investment Analysis», 7th Edition, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 2007.
  5. Reilly, K.F., Brown, K.C., «Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management», 10th Edition, South-Western Cengage Learning, 2009. 
6.8S - Sales Force Management
6.9S - Organic Chemistry
6.10S - Precision Agriculture
6.11S - Industrial Organization
6.12S - European Integration and Agricultural Policy
6.13S - Agricultural Cooperatives Management
6.14S - Waste and by Product Management of Agricultural Enterprises

7th Semester

7.4C - Human Resource Management

7.4C - Human Resource Management

Human Resource Management

Code: 7.4C

Semester: 7 / Year: 4 (Mantatory)

Teachers: Bouranta Athanasia

Course Web Page

Lectures hours (per week): 3

laboratory hours (per week):

Subject

The course highlights the major role of Human Resources Management (HRM) in organizations. It covers a wide breadth of theories and applications dealing with workforce planning, job specification, candidates’ selection and recruitment, training and employee development, payment systems, employee appraisals, employee relationships and compliance with regulations.

Educational Aims

The goal of this course is to help students understand HR practices and, as future managers, learn to support their employees in order to obtain the highest possible performance. Atthe end of the conflict management course, studentswill acquire the ability to:

  • Understand the role of HRM in organizations and identify the main activities associated with it
  • Learn the history of HRM science
  • Make best use of workforce planning methods
  • Design precise job and role specifications
  • Learn the techniques for effective candidate selection
  • Organize training and career development programs
  • Evaluate employee performance
  • Guarantee a safe work environment
  • Become familiar with techniques for sustaining high-performing employees

Student Evaluation

Student assessment is mainly based on the written examination at the end of the semester, which includes questions that evaluate both the acquired knowledge by students and their ability to utilize them critically.

However, students can gain extra points by working on the assignments given to them during the term. This is not compulsory but can significantly contribute to the final record. Grades are based 20% on assignment and 80% on final exams.

Bibliography

  1. Χυτήρης, Λ. (2018), Διοίκηση Ανθρωπίνων Πόρων, Εκδόσεις Μπένου (in Greek).
  2. Παπαλεξανδρή, Ν. και Μπουραντάς, Δ. (2016), Διοίκηση Ανθρωπίνων Πόρων, Εκδόσεις Μπένου (in Greek).
  3. Bratton, J. and Gold, J. (2012) Human Resource Management: Theory and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan, London.
  4. Mathis., R.L, Jackson, J.H and Valentine, S.R (2013), Human Resource Management, Cengage Learning, USA.
7.5C - International & Export Marketing
7.6C - Macroeconomics
7.8C - Business Strategy and Policy

7th Semester - Optional Courses

7.12S - Econometrics

7.12S - Econometrics

Econometrics

Code: 7.12S

Semester: 7 / Year: 4 (Optional)

Teachers: Pachis Dimitrios

Course Web Page

Lectures hours (per week): 3

laboratory hours (per week):

Subject

Multiple Linear Regression.

(i) The models with two and p explanatory variables (using matrix representation): the detection of a linear relation using a three dimensional scatter diagram (for p independent variables see iii below), the model specification using theoretical information and empirical evidence for the choice of the explanatory variables, interpretation of the partial regression coefficients, point estimation of the parameters using the method of Ordinary Least Squares (OLS), standard errors of the estimators, partial elasticities of the dependent variables with respect to the independent variables and their interpretations, the classical assumptions for the “best” estimators using OLS, interval estimation of the parameters, hypotheses testing for the significance of each regression coefficient, overall significance test with the Analysis of Variance, the coefficient of multiple determination and the adjusted coefficient of multiple determination, Mallow’s Cp the Extra Sum of Squares Principle, partial correlations, indicator variables and predictions.

(ii) Model Selection Methods: Backward Elimination, Forward Selection, Stepwise Regression and All Possible Regressions.

(iii) Violations of the Classical Assumptions and Remedies: model specification errors (omitted and irrelevant variables, incorrect functional form etc.), heteroscedasticity, collinearity (or multicollinearity), autocorrelation, lack of normality of the error term, use of random regressors. The possible causes and consequences of each violation, and methods for detection; residual analysis, graphical techniques, statistical tests, Variance Inflation Factors and Condition Indices (for the magnitudes of eigenvalues of the XTX matrix). Various remedies including data transformations, and the methods of Generalized Least Squares and Weighted Least Squares for the estimation of parameters, in the regression models with AR(1) and heteroscedastic errors respectively. 

Educational Aims

Student Evaluation

Written exams at the end of the semester.

Bibliography

  1. Draper, N. και Smith, H., Εφαρμοσμένη Ανάλυση Παλινδρόμησης, Παπαζήση, Αθήνα 1997 (in Greek).
  2. Johnston, J. και DiNardo, J., Οικονομετρικές Μέθοδοι, Κλειδάριθμος, Αθήνα 2004 (in Greek).
  3. Κάτος, Α., Οικονομετρία (Θεωρία και Εφαρμογές), Ζυγός, Θεσσαλονίκη 2004 (in Greek).
  4. Χρήστου, Γ., Εισαγωγή στην Οικονομετρία, Τόμος Α, Gutenberg, Αθήνα 2004 (in Greek). 
7.2S - Electronic Commerce
7.4S - Advertising, Promotion Management and Public Relations
7.5S - Ecology and Environmental Protection

8th Semester

8.1C - Entrepreneurial Innovation and Competitiveness

8.1C - Entrepreneurial Innovation and Competitiveness

Entrepreneurial Innovation and Competitiveness

Code: 8.1C

Semester: 8 / Year: 4 (Mantatory)

Teachers: Tsampra Maria

Course Web Page

Lectures hours (per week): 3

laboratory hours (per week):

Subject

Introduction to the concept of Innovation and the New Economy of Knowledge and Learning. Technology and Innovation in Economics and Business theory. Innovation as a strategy of national/regional economic growth: systems of knowledge and learning, policies enhancing innovation. Innovation as a strategy of business competitiveness: managing innovation. Case-studies.

Educational Aims

The course gives students the knowledge to understand the significance of innovation for economic and entrepreneurial competitiveness. Students will also gain insights in key concepts and frameworks in innovation and innovation management.

Student Evaluation

Exam in the end of the term. Optional essay in the mid-term, contributing 25% to the final grade, presenting case-studies of innovative firms.

Bibliography

  1. Πιπερόπουλος Π. 2008. Επιχειρηματική Καινοτομία & Business Clusters. Αθήνα: ΣΤΑΜΟΥΛΗΣ, (in Greek)
  2. Χατζηκωνσταντίνου Γ. & Γωνιάδης Η. 2009. Επιχειρηματικότητα και καινοτομία. Από την ίδρυση στη διοίκηση και την επιβίωση της νέας επιχείρησης. Αθήνα: Gutenberg, (in Greek).        
  3. Karlsson, C., Johansson, B., Stough, R.R. 2009. Innovation, Agglomeration and Regional Competition. Edward Elgra: New Horizons in Regional Science series.
  4. Matthews, Charles H. & Brueggemann, Ralph, 2015.Innovation and Entrepreneurship. A Competency Framework.Routledge (346 pages).
8.6C - Financial And Capital Markets
8.7C - Total Quality Management & Business Excellence
8.8C - Civil Law

8th Semester - Optional Courses

8.1S - Industrial Marketing

8.1S - Industrial Marketing

Industrial Marketing

Code: 8.1S

Semester: 8 / Year: 4 (Optional)

Teachers: Mavrommati Athanassia

Course Web Page

Lectures hours (per week): 3

laboratory hours (per week):

Subject

The goal of the subject is to introduce to students the specifics of B2B marketing and the basic concepts of marketing theory, the peculiarities of organizations’ purchasing behavior, and the strategic marketing process in B2B markets including market analysis, segmentation, targeting and positioning of various types of B2B companies. At the same time, the course introduces to students the specifics of marketing mix tactical tools for B2B markets.

Content:

  • Basic differences between B2B and B2C marketing 
  • Organizations’ purchasing behavior 
  • Strategic marketing process:
    • Analyzing the organization market 
    • B2B market segmentation 
    • Targeting and positioning 
    • Strategic planning 
  • B2B marketing mix specifics 
  • Product as the fundamental tool of B2B marketing 
     

Educational Aims

Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to: 

  • apply the principles and basic concepts of marketing and management theory in B2B markets. 
  • explain and describe significant differences functioning market B2B and B2C market, create a marketing strategy, analyze and evaluate the behavior of various type of B2B companies and markets, 
  • recognize the peculiarities purchasing behavior of organizations and the strategic marketing process in B2B markets including market analysis, segmentation, targeting and positioning in specific conditions B2B markets 
  • plan and use the tactical tools of the marketing mix in order to effectively meet the needs of the B2B market.

Student Evaluation

It is based on the marks achieved in the written exams taken at the end of the term. However students can gain extra points by working on assignments given to them during semester. This is not compulsory, but can significantly contribute to the finally achieved degree.

Bibliography

  1. Αυλωνίτης Γεώργιος, Δημητριάδης Σέργιος, Ήντουνας Κωνσταντίνος, (2014), Στρατηγικό Βιομηχανικό (Β2Β) Μάρκετινγκ, Εκδόσεις Rosili, (in Greek).
  2. Ross Brennan, Louise Canning, Raymond McDowell , (2011), Business-to-Business Marketing, (2nd Edition), SAGE Publications Ltd.  
  3. Michael D. Hutt, Thomas W. Speh, (2012), Business Marketing Management: B2B, (11th Edition), South Western Cengage Learning
8.7S - Agricultural Production and Environment
8.11S - Practice in Enterprises
8.12S - Decision Theory
8.13S - Risk Management in the Agricultural Sector
8.14S - Production Management
8.16S - Supply Chain Management
8.17S - Commercial Law
8.18S - Service Marketing
8.19S - Business Intelligence Systems
8.20S - Retail Marketing
8.21S - Taxation Law and Labour Law

9th Semester

9.4C - Financing and Investment Appraisal

9.4C - Financing and Investment Appraisal

Financing and Investment Appraisal

Code: 9.4C

Semester: 9 / Year: 5 (Mantatory)

Teachers: Pendaraki Konstantina

Course Web Page

Lectures hours (per week): 3

laboratory hours (per week):

Subject

  • Financial operation and business environment,
  • Time value of money,
  • Evaluating risk and return,
  • Financing business activities,
  • Investment appraisal and Decision making,
  • Cost benefit analysis,
  • The basics of capital budgeting,
  • Evaluating Cash flows,
  • Break-even analysis,
  • Operating leverage and Financial leverage,
  • Weighted Average Cost of Capital
  • Pricing stocks and bonds
  • Working Capital management
Educational Aims

Investments are the most important factor of growth, because they mobilize, combine and exploit all factors of production such as soil, human resources, capital, know-how and entrepreneurship. Making investments with a high rate of efficiency requires rational decision making and evaluation of investment projects. Specifically, the course aims to introduce students to the basic principles of finance and to learn the basic techniques and methods of Financial Management and Investment Evaluation with a view to their practical application. In this sense the lesson is the basis on which specific methodologies and techniques are developed in individual specific courses of financial management. Finally, the aim of the course is to understand from the students the importance of evaluating investment projects in the modern financial environment and the transformation of financial management into a distinct scientific field /profession.
At the end of this course the students shouldbe able to:
  • Understand the concept of Net Asset Value,
  • Understand the concepts of Present and Future values,
  • Calculate risk and return,
  • Calculate WACC,
  • Calculate NPV, IRR, MIRR, PBP,
  • Use appropriate tools for capital investment process,
  • Pricing stocks and bonds,
  • Analysing Break Even Point,
  • Calculate working capital.
In addition, withinthe workshop, exercises are solved so that the students gain essential skills and more flexibility in dealing with practical problems of evaluation and financing of investment projects.

Student Evaluation

Written examination aftertheend of the semester (100%) including:

  • QuickQuestions,
  • TestDevelopment Questions,
  • Problemsolving

Bibliography

  1. Ζοπουνίδης, Κ. «Βασικές Αρχές Χρηματοοικονομικού Μάνατζμεντ», Εκδόσεις Κλειδάριθμος, Αθήνα, 2013 (in Greek).
  2. Κιόχος, Π., Παπανκολάου, Γ., Θάνος, Γ., και Κιόχος, Α. «Χρηματοοικονομική Διοίκηση και Πολιτική», Σύγχρονη Εκδοτική, Αθήνα, 2002 (in Greek).
  3. BodieZvi, KaneAlex, MarcusAlan, «Επενδύσεις», Επιμέλεια: Κ. Συριόπουλος, Εκδόσεις UTOPIA, Αθήνα, 2014 (in Greek).
  4. BrealeyRichard, MyersStewart, AllenFranklin, «Αρχές Χρηματοοικονομικής των Επιχειρήσεων», Επιμέλεια: Χ. Αλεξάκης, Δ. Καινούργιος, Δ. Κουσενίδης, Α. Σάμιτας, Κ. Συριόπουλος, Εκδόσεις UTOPIA, Αθήνα, 2013 (in Greek).
9.5C - Marketing Research
9.6C - Rural Entrepreneurship & Regional Development
9.7C - Price Analysis of Agricultural Products

9th Semester - Optional Courses

9.8S - Project Management

9.8S - Project Management

Project Management

Code: 9.8S

Semester: 9 / Year: 5 (Optional)

Teachers: Tassopoulos Ioannis

Course Web Page: https://eclass.upatras.gr/courses/DEAPT132/

Lectures hours (per week): 2

laboratory hours (per week): 1

Subject

  1. Introduction to project management
  2. The history of project management
  3. Project management standards
  4. Project integration management
  5. Process management
  6. Project management plan
  7. Project lifecycle
  8. Feasibility study
  9. Project managementscope
  10. Work breakdown structure(WBS)
  11. Time management (time estimation)
  12. Critical path method (CPM)
  13. Gannt chart
  14. Procurement management
  15. Resource and cost management (cost estimate)
  16. Cash flow
  17. Project execution, monitoring and control
  18. Earned value
  19. Quality Management
  20. Risk management
  21. Communication management
  22. Organization structure

Educational Aims

The purpose of this course is initially to present and explain the principles of project management design and control techniques.  With the help of concrete examples and exercises students can understand in depth how to apply the basic principles of project management, as well as its tools, techniques and methods. So, this course enables students to gain specialized knowledge required to be able to use all project management planning and control tools and techniques. 

By the end of this course the student will be able to:

  • explain and use the project management planning and control principles and techniques
  • apply project management principles, tool, techniques and methods to real problems from the field of economic and agronomic sciences, but also in their daily lives
  • use knowledge and understanding acquired in a manner that indicates a professional approach to their  work or profession
  • have competences typically demonstrated by developing and supporting arguments and solving problems within their field of knowledge
  • communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions to both specialist and non-specialist public
  • develop knowledge acquisition skills needed to continue to post graduate studies with a high degree of autonomy
  • gather and interpret relevant data (in their knowledge field) to form judgments that include reflection on relevant scientific issues
  • be able to use their knowledge, understanding and ability to solve problems in new or unfamiliar environment within broader (or multidisciplinary) context, related to their field
  • be able to communicate with clarity their conclusions, knowledge and reasoning in both specialized and non-specialized audience

Student Evaluation

Written examination after the end of the semester (100%) including:

  • Multiple-choice questions
  • Solving problems of project management (processes, scheduling, resources, supplies, costs, cash flow)
  • Benchmarking theory elements

Bibliography

  1. Burke Roy, Διαχείριση Έργου, 1η έκδοση, 2014, Εκδόσεις Κριτική Α.Ε. (in Greek).
  2. Shtub Avraham, Διαχείριση Έργων, 1η έκδοση, 2008, Εκδόσεις Επίκεντρο Α.Ε. (in Greek).
  3. Project Management: Planning and Control Techniques, Roy Burke, 5th Edition, Publisher: Wiley; 5 edition (November 25, 2013), Language: English, ISBN-10: 1118561252.
  4. Fundamentals of Project Management: Tools and Techniques (PROJECT MANAGEMENT SERIES), Roy Burke, Publisher: Burke Publishing; 2nd edition (January 15, 2010), Language: English, ISBN-10: 0958273367.
  5. Project Management: Processes, Methodologies, and Economics, Avraham Shtub,‎ Jonathan F. Bard,‎ Shlomo Globerson, Publisher: Pearson; 2 edition (October 30, 2004), Language: English, ISBN-10: 0130413313.
9.10S - International trade of Agricultural Products
9.11S - International Accounting Models and International Accounting
9.12S - Applications of Rural Regional Development
9.13S - Issues of Entrepreneurship
9.14S - Quantitative Methods for Business Decision Making
9.15S - Theoretical and Practical Dimensions of Vocational Training and On-the-Job Learning

10th Semester

10.4C - Dissertation (Thesis)

10.4C - Dissertation (Thesis)

Dissertation (Thesis)

Code: 10.4C

Semester: 10 / Year: 5 (Mantatory)

Bibliography

  1. Βιβλίο [50659255]: Πώς γίνεται μια επιστημονική εργασία;, Ζαφειρόπουλος Κώστας Λεπτομέρειες (Το βιβλίο αυτό μπορούν οι φοιτητές να το δηλώσουν στον Εύδοξο).